Academics

Hope incorporates a biblical worldview into our classes. We prepare our students for college and life through excellent, rigorous, and relevant classes. We emphasize public speaking and argumentative writing throughout our curriculum. In addition to core classes, students can select from a variety of unique electives each semester.

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About Chicago Hope Academy

Your high school decision is an important one. This is the place where you will spend the next four years growing in friendships, knowledge, and most importantly, in your faith. At Chicago Hope Academy you will find the supportive community you need to achieve your goals.

OUR PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

A Christian Philosophy of Education must begin, have its continual frame of reference, and end with the eternal God. Such conformity, acknowledges the following:

God is the ultimate source of all truth (John 14:6). Therefore, His Word (revealed truth) holds a position of priority over human reason. His Word enables one to view all of life, in both its temporal and eternal aspects from the perspective of the centrality of God rather than the centrality of man (Psalm 1:18-32). Any distinction between “sacred truth” and “secular truth” is, therefore, a false dichotomy.

A differentiation must be made between earthly wisdom (1 Corinthians 1-2; James 3:15) and spiritual wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:30, 7:10-16; James 3:13,17), while acknowledging that the source of all true wisdom and understanding is God Himself (Proverbs 1:7, 9:10, 15:33; Col 2:3).

The purpose of Christian education is to demonstrate to the student his need of a personal, saving relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, and to nurture, admonish, and encourage the student to live in conformity with the revealed will of God through a life of service, wholly dedicated to and dependent upon God (Romans 12).

The process of Christian education requires the natural integration and consistent application of God’s Word into every area (academic, extracurricular, administrative, etc.) of Hope’s program (Ephesians 4:4-6).

Students do not have to be Christians in order to attend Chicago Hope Academy. We do not require that our students or their families align their personal faith with Hope’s Statement of Faith. Hope does, however, make no apologies about teaching from a Biblical worldview. We do require that our students abide by the boundaries and guidelines set by the Academy, with the understanding that many of these guidelines are Biblically-based.

Read our Statement of Faith

CORE CLASSES BY GRADE

View Elective Courses

9th Grade

English I
Algebra I
Human Geography
Biology
Spanish I
Foundations of Faith

10th Grade

English II
Geometry
World History
Chemistry

Spanish II

Sociology: Christianity & Culture
Psychology: Christianity & Self

11th Grade

English III
Algebra II
U.S. History
Environmental Science
Philosophy: Love of Wisdom
Elective

12th Grade

English IV
Statistics/AP Calc
Systematic Theology
College & Career Prep
Applied Economics
Civics & Geography
Electives

Foundations of Faith

Foundations of Faith is a freshman level, year-long Bible course that seeks to introduce students to the all-encompassing scope of the Hebrew Old Testament and the Christian New Testament. This course lays a foundation for Hope students that they will build on throughout their high school experience. Students will become familiar with the concepts of God, creation, fall, exodus, covenant, theocracy, kingship, prophesy, Messiah, redemption, salvation, and more. By studying history through the recorded truth of the Bible and other prominent scholarly sources, coupled with accounts and stories from over 2000 years of faith testimonies, this course stakes the claim that the Christ of the Bible is also the Son of God, the redeemer of the world, and the only means to eternal life with mankind’s creator.

Psychology: Christianity and Self

Psychology: Christianity and Self is a sophomore level semester long Bible course that focuses on Scripture, Christ, Redemption, and the construct of self: mind, body, and soul. Following the Survey of the Bible, Christianity and the Mind takes the study of Christianity to a more personal place, a place of self-reflection, self-discipline, and self-understanding. Students engage in contemporary and traditional reflections of Scripture by men and women who have grappled with the notion of being a Christ-follower in an age of atheism, agnosticism, humanism, universalism, and nihilism. This course prepares students for their junior level Bible class which focuses on Christ-followers immersed in a culture of need.

Sociology: Christianity and Culture

Sociology: Christianity and Self is a sophomore level semester long Bible course that focuses on the principles of Scripture that teach followers of Christ how to engage in culture. With the study of both the Bible and current writings on Christians’ role in culture, this course guides discussion on race, diversity, feminism, poverty, politics, abortion, homosexuality, environmental responsibilities, and gender. Students are encouraged to learn how to embrace kindness, justice, and truth in an age of hate and deception.

Philosophy: Love of Wisdom

Philosophy is a junior level yearlong course that focuses on key ideas beginning with the Presocratics and ending with the Postmoderns. As defined by the term, the philosophy course seeks to mine the wisdom proffered and then to compare and contrast it with the Wisdom presented in the Bible. Some of the key ideas discussed are epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, ethics, and logic. Students will wrestle with new questions and old answers. Beyond questions and answers, the course aims for students to encounter the mystery of the Divine. Ultimately, the goal is to fall in love with the One who alone is Wisdom.

Theology & Worldview

This course surveys the fundamental beliefs of the Christian faith and their implications for the Church and the individual believer by examining and engaging with scripture, history, and philosophy. The second half of this course explores worldview and apologetics, examining the fundamental presuppositions of the Christian faith by engaging the question of God’s existence. Upon this foundation, the course will build a robust, cumulative case for Christian Theism and discuss how to defend and live out the fundamental beliefs of the Christian faith.

English I

English I is a year-long course that focuses on the study of literature, language, and composition. The course emphasizes the introduction and practice of the essential skills of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. Toward that end, students study various genres of literature through a wide variety of literature selections from across the globe with diverse racial, cultural, social, and gender representation. Students are taught literary interpretation, written and oral critique of literature, and literature’s place in the history of human thought from a Christian worldview.

English II

English II is a year-long course designed as a continuation of English I that seeks to build upon prior knowledge and skill in the study of literature, language, and composition. Like English I, this course places great emphasis on the continued development and study of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. Drawing from all genres, students study a wide variety of selections of literature from across the globe with diverse racial, cultural, social and gender representation. Literary interpretation and critique are studied in light of the history of human thought from a Christian worldview.

English III

This year-long course functions as an introduction to both the American literary tradition as well as the skill classically known as rhetoric. In this course, we will read novels and excerpts from key American writers. Doing so will open up the riches of the American literary tradition to students. There is a special emphasis on how their experiences of America relate to and inform our own. Students should feel as if the authors we read this year “give them words” with which they can explain and describe their own lives, both its hardships and its joys. Furthermore, this course will deepen the student’s skills in argumentation through an in-depth exploration into rhetoric.  Rhetoric is first and foremost the skill of listening. After listening, one can constructively formulate his or her own thoughts and respond. Students will engage with the different facets of rhetoric, such as rhetorical situations, types of claims, types of evidence, diction, and style.

Honors English III

This year-long course functions as an introduction to both the American literary tradition as well as the skill classically known as rhetoric. The honors course offers students a more rigorous engagement with key novels, essays, short stories, and poems from prominent American authors. The analytical approach in this course will open up the riches of the American literary tradition to students. There is a special emphasis on how their experiences of America relate to and inform our own. Students should feel as if the authors we read this year “give them words” with which they can explain and describe their own lives, both its hardships and its joys. Furthermore, this course will deepen the student’s skills in argumentation through an in-depth exploration into rhetoric.  Rhetoric is first and foremost the skill of listening. After listening, one can constructively formulate his or her own thoughts and respond. Students will engage with the different facets of rhetoric, such as rhetorical situations, types of claims, types of evidence, diction, and style.

English IV

English IV is a year-long course designed as a continuation of English III yet with an accelerated pace and depth of content that focuses on the study of literature, language, and composition. Like English III, this course places great emphasis on the continued development of the grade-level appropriate essential skills of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. In this course, students study in depth a wide variety of selections from various literary genres taken from across the globe. There is an intentional focus on diverse racial, cultural, social and gender-based works, used for an advanced development of literary interpretation and models for student writing. The structural framework of the course revolves around the study of universal themes as found in fiction and non-fiction literature from around the globe and across time as seen from a Christian worldview.

AP Literature & Composition

AP Literature & Composition is a year-long, advanced English course that may be taken in place of English III or English IV. Being a college-level course, this class will challenge students to think more critically, read more thoroughly, and write more effectively. AP Literature & Composition will follow the Advanced Placement curriculum guidelines, preparing students to take the AP examination at the end of the year.

AP Language & Composition

The AP English Language and Composition course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and for intellectually responsible civic engagement. The course guides students in becoming curious, critical, and responsive readers of diverse texts and becoming flexible, reflective writers of texts addressed to diverse audiences for diverse purposes. The reading and writing students do in the course should deepen and expand their understanding of how written language functions rhetorically: to communicate writers’ intentions and elicit readers’ responses in particular situations.

Language Arts

Language Arts will be focused on all things reading! Comprehension, vocabulary, literary terms, genres, etc. This class will supplement their English I class with the intention to build reading muscles. It’s our goal that each student jump at least two reading levels by the end of the year and fall in love with reading. Students will be assisted in getting a library card and taught how to find books that interest them. Students will be listening to reading, reading aloud, and provided time for silent reading. Students will be taught how to read at home: find a special place, find a quiet place, leave the phone in a different room, etc.

This is a valuable class for freshmen to enhance their reading scores and to have a lot of fun! The books will be high-interest that get students hooked on reading. Time to put down the screens and pick up a book!

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra is a one-year math course designed to prepare the student for Algebra I. The course focuses on mathematical principles like number sense, number fluency, estimation, fractions, algebraic formulas, measurement and geometry skills in the context of algebra preparedness.

Algebra I

Algebra I is a one-year course intent upon the student’s understanding and application of the history of Algebra and its practical application to the lives of the students and their other disciplines. This foundational course aims to offer students a broad overview of algebraic topics. In this course students will hone their skills of simplifying, evaluating, and solving basic equations and functions of algebra. While building fluency with these skills, students will develop the habit of problem solving and the proper use of mathematical symbols and rules which dictate their use in patterns and structures set forth in the number system.

Algebra II

Algebra II is a one-year course which builds upon the skills and knowledge learned in Algebra I, creating a working understanding of the real number system. The study of linear equations, sequences, series, functions, graphs, inequalities, polynomials, exponentials, logarithms and radical expressions are among the many advanced mathematical principles studied.

Geometry

Geometry is a one-year course that can be divided into two general categories of study: shapes & deductive, geometric arguments (also known as proofs). The study of shapes includes learning terms and concepts relating to one, two, and three-dimensional shapes. The study of proofs requires an understanding of shapes developed earlier in the course, and it includes learning what deductive arguments are and how they are used within the study of geometry so that students can both solve and create geometric proofs. By the end of the course, students should have developed a well-rounded understanding of important geometric concepts, an ability to communicate in the language of geometry, and an ability to think critically by understanding and developing geometry proofs.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus is a one-year course designed for a highly motivated and above-average student with prior success in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course consists of the combined study of analytical geometry, trigonometry, derivatives, integrals, matrices, functions, logic fields, relations, vector spaces, methods of proof and other math analysis topics as preparation for calculus.

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a year-long course of advanced mathematics in which students master knowledge and skills relating but not limited to the rate of change of variables, volume by rotation, derivatives, optimization problems, integrals, integration and area under a curve. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB examination.

Statistics

Statistics is a specially designed advanced mathematics course offered with the intent of introducing students to major concepts and tools as they relate to data collection, analysis, and conclusions. In this course, sampling, experimentation, patterns, and inference are a few of the conceptual themes applied to the study of statistics.

Accounting

This course is a one semester elective that is a highly integrated study with a strong focus on the three primary financial statements – income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Students will learn the fundamental language of business—concepts such as costs of goods sold, expenses, good vs. bad debt, accrual vs. cash methods, FIFO and LIFO, capitalization, depreciation, and more. The course is intended to expose students to possible career paths in accounting and other finance related fields (wealth management, investment banking, asset management, etc.)

Logic

Logic, which began historically, and in each individual still begins, with the wish to distinguish good and bad reasonings…” The course seeks to introduce central concepts of logic and logical analysis. Major topics will include basic syllogistic as introduced by Aristotle, the fundamental types of reasoning, elementary symbolic logic, and simple argument mapping. Important themes will be (i) symbolic representation as a way of representing concepts or objects abstracted from given situations, which allows us to focus on the general properties of a concept or object and the relationships between them — a powerful tool for understanding complex ideas and solving problems — and (ii) how constructing sound arguments involves building a valid progression of statements that follows rules of interference, which serves to justify our conclusions, effectively communicate them to others, and be responsive to the perspective of others.

Biology/Health

Biology is a year-long course which acknowledges the created world of God and deals with the relationships between living organisms and their environment, including the various levels of classification of the living organisms known to man in the molecular, cellular and ecological realms. This course places emphasis on the scientific skills of experimentation, measurement, and reporting.

Honors / AP Biology

Honors/AP Biology is an advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level biology course. With an acknowledgement of a God-created world, this class walks students through research, study, investigations, and exploration of such topics like creationism, intelligent design, evolution, energetics, information storage and transfer, and system interactions. This course will prepare all students to take the AP Biology examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

Chemistry Concepts

Chemistry Concepts is an introductory, year-long course focused on basic understanding and application of chemistry. The course is designed for students who need the main concepts of chemistry at a pace that determines successful acquisition. Chemistry Concepts teaches students about the structure, composition, and changes of matter while focusing on the topics of atomic structure, chemical reactions, solutions, gases, and lab techniques.

Chemistry

Chemistry is a year-long course focused on the applied knowledge of chemistry. Through the study of the structure and composition of matter, this course takes students beyond the textbook into the lab for hands-on chemical experimentation with the purpose of understanding and applying scientific knowledge from the field of chemistry. The students gain a comprehensive understanding of chemical properties and interactions. Subtopics include: atomic structure, periodic table, nuclear reactions, hydrocarbons & alcohol, stoichiometry, and gas laws.

Honors Chemistry

Honors Chemistry is a year-long course focused on an in-depth investigation of structures, properties, and changes of matter designed to prepare the students to continue their studies in Chemistry at the college level. Students will use many tools to gain an understanding of the chemical world. An inquiry-based course, students will complete laboratory work or internet researches, develop critical thinking and apply the knowledge and skills to a particular issue or problem. Topics include atomic models, quantum numbers, electron configurations, periodic table, periodicity, atoms/molecules/ions, redox, stoichiometry, hydrocarbons, alcohol, carbonyl compounds, acids & bases, buffers, gas laws and nuclear chemistry.

Environmental Science

This course serves to provide students with the basic knowledge of environmental science, including environmental processes, concepts, issues, and proposed solutions. With the familiarity of the material, students will then be able to apply these ideas to real-world situations. Aside from classroom development, students will participate in hands-on work in both a lab and field setting. Students will also be asked to further engage in the class by reading one novel each semester and participating in class discussions. Upon this foundation, students will build an understanding of the processes, issues, and proposed solutions of the earth in order to be better stewards of creation.

AP Environmental Science

This course serves to provide students with the basic knowledge of environmental science, including environmental processes, concepts, issues, and proposed solutions. With the familiarity of the material, students will then be able to apply these ideas to real-world situations. These units comprise the content and conceptual understandings that colleges and universities typically expect students to master to qualify for college credit and/or placement. Aside from classroom development, students will participate in hands-on work in both a lab and field setting. At the end of the spring semester, students are expected to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge on the AP Environmental Science exam.

Zoology

This course serves to provide students with the basic knowledge of zoology. The fall semester will consist of content relating to invertebrate zoology, while the spring semester will contain information pertaining to vertebrate zoology. These units comprise the context and conceptual understanding of the specific characteristics that distinguish groups of species from one another. Aside from classroom development, students will participate in hands-on work in both a lab and field setting. Students will also be asked to further engage in the class by reading one novel each semester and participating in class discussions. Upon this foundation, students will build an understanding of animal groups in order to apply them to real-world examples. Students will be able to utilize these skills in their everyday lives by naming and classifying species.

Human Geography/Computer Literacy

Year long Course

World History

World History is a year-long course that seeks to outline and study the history of the world from prehistoric eras through modern day. Students are taught to research, study, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary historical texts that provide a general overview of the history of mankind across the globe, including all continental cultural, social, political, and economic developments.

Honors / AP World History

Honors/AP World History is a more advanced, accelerated course that studies in great breadth and depth the history of mankind from 1200 AD to the present day. Students will engage in research and analysis of primary and secondary sources as they delve deep into the history of the world. This course will prepare all students to take the AP World History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

On Level/Honors U.S. History

The History of the United States is a series of true stories as experienced by real people. It includes stories of courage and freedom alongside stories of malice and destruction. Students will learn to navigate these complex stories and use primary and secondary sources to tell the story of the United States. This course is designed to facilitate an awareness of U.S. history and to develop key historical thinking skills. The overarching theme of the course is “The Meaning of Freedom.” We will be constantly asking the question: “What is the meaning of freedom in the United States?” through examing the political and social conditions that make freedom possible. We will also dive deeply into discussions about the boundaries of freedom, and ways in which it has been expanded or limited in our 244+ history.

Honors students will complete independent projects throughout the length of the course to earn Honors credit.

AP U.S. History

The History of the United States is a series of true stories as experienced by real people. It includes stories of courage and freedom alongside stories of malice and destruction. Students will learn to navigate these complex stories and use primary and secondary sources to tell the story of the United States. This course is designed to facilitate an awareness of U.S. history in accordance with the guidelines of the College Board, developing key historical thinking skills as we go. This course will focus on using evidence-based reasoning to construct arguments in response to key historical questions. At the end of the year, all students will sit for the AP US History Exam, which may count towards college credit.

AP Human Geography

AP Human Geography is an introductory college-level human geography course. Students cultivate their understanding of human geography through data and geographic analyses as they explore topics like patterns and spatial organization, human impacts and interactions with their environment, and spatial processes and societal changes.

Civics

Civics is a one-semester course that teaches the history and concepts of citizenship and government, with focuses on civic life, politics, and the development of the United States. This course provides information on the connections between American politics and world affairs, law and power, the American constitution and the rights of its citizens, and the American political system and other political systems throughout the world.

AP U.S. Government:

AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.

Spanish I

Spanish I is a year-long course designed to teach the beginnings of Spanish language acquisition emphasizing the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing Spanish at an introductory level. Although the main focus of the class is Spanish language communication, there is an intentional incorporation of the teaching of Hispanic cultures for historical and social relevance. The course reinforces the continual practice of the correct usage of basic vocabulary and Spanish language structures while instilling an appreciation for the rich history and diversity of the language.

Spanish II

Spanish II is a year-long course that continues the progress made in Spanish I toward the acquisition of the Spanish language. Students will participate in a course designed for proficiency and the furthering of communication in oral and written expression. Cultural significance takes a larger role as students are encouraged to engage in dialogue with native speakers and to participate in the consumption of media presented in the Spanish language.

A more sophisticated study of grammar and language will take place as students advance in their study of the Spanish language.

Spanish III

Spanish III & IV are year-long courses designed to bring the student to a level of conversational mastery with vocabulary, grammar, and sentence formation that demonstrates advanced language acquisition. Introductory level short stories and other Spanish literature and media are used to further develop paraphrasing and reading comprehension skills. Students are pushed toward advanced proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking Spanish.

Heritage 1: Spanish for Native Speakers

Heritage 2: Spanish for Native Speakers

Greek 1

Greek 2

College & Career Prep

College & Career Prep is a semester-long course. The focus of the course is to teach the basics of college-level academic writing and communication. The objective of this class is to lay a foundation for communication in the college application process, post-secondary education, and beyond. The emphasis is on honing basic academic writing skills including advanced essay writing, research, and technical writing. This course also teaches and equips students to perfect their college admissions personal statement.

Applied Economics

Applied Economics is a semester-long course taken during the second semester senior year. Economics II focuses on the personal practice of sound economic principles. The knowledge of economics is taught in application of personal finance as students study banking, loan and debt systems, college and career money management, real estate, investment and more. The goal of this course is to send students out into the world with the competencies and skills to achieve and maintain financial stability and growth.

Finding God in Film

This course will examine the theology present in the Star Wars universe, the Harry Potter universe, and the Spider Verse. Students will gain necessary skills to develop discernment, active listening, and critical thinking through the evaluation of theological themes such as messiah, salvation, sin and evil, the end of the world, etc in these films.

Archaeology

In this course, we will learn the history and methods of archaeology while exploring the world of the Bible and how archaeology illuminates Scripture. A study of cultures, customs, languages and rituals that throw light on the statements in God’s Word.

EYE (Entrepreneurial Youth Experience)

EYE takes the concepts and practices of how to build a business and puts them into action for students. Throughout the first semester, students learn the building blocks of business and entrepreneurship in the classroom, through mentorship, visiting businesses, and hearing from guest speakers. The second semester is dedicated to building a business and putting it into action which includes a business plan, a business pitch competition (Shark Tank style) to receive a start up loan, building a web presence, tracking sales and revenue, and hosting a trade show. Here is a link to the official EYE site for further details.

Visual Art

Visual Art is a one-year course meant to equip students with a well-rounded ability to produce artistic work using standard artistic mediums and techniques. The course includes an introductory consideration of what art is and why we create it, as well as an ongoing study and application of the 7 Elements of Art (space, line, shape, form, color, value, texture) and the 7 Principles of Art (unity, repetition, balance, movement, emphasis, contrast, proportion).

AP Biology

AP Biology is an advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level biology course. With an acknowledgement of a God-created world, this class walks students through research, study, investigations, and exploration of such topics like creationism, intelligent design, evolution, energetics, information storage and transfer, and system interactions. This course will prepare all students to take the AP Biology examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a year-long course of advanced mathematics in which students master knowledge and skills relating but not limited to the rate of change of variables, volume by rotation, derivatives, optimization problems, integrals, integration and area under a curve. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB examination.

AP Environmental Science

AP Environmental Science is a year-long, advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level course. Students cultivate their understanding of the interrelationships of the natural world through inquiry-based lab investigations and field work as they explore concepts like the four Big Ideas; energy transfer, interactions between earth systems, interactions between different species and the environment, and sustainability.

AP Government

AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.

AP Human Geography

AP Human Geography is an introductory college-level human geography course. Students cultivate their understanding of human geography through data and geographic analyses as they explore topics like patterns and spatial organization, human impacts and interactions with their environment, and spatial processes and societal changes.

AP Language & Composition

The AP English Language and Composition course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and for intellectually responsible civic engagement. The course guides students in becoming curious, critical, and responsive readers of diverse texts and becoming flexible, reflective writers of texts addressed to diverse audiences for diverse purposes. The reading and writing students do in the course should deepen and expand their understanding of how written language functions rhetorically: to communicate writers’ intentions and elicit readers’ responses in particular situations.

AP Literature & Composition

AP Literature & Composition is a year-long, advanced English course that may be taken in place of English III or English IV. Being a college-level course, this class will challenge students to think more critically, read more thoroughly, and write more effectively. AP Literature & Composition will follow the Advanced Placement curriculum guidelines, preparing students to take the AP examination at the end of the year.

AP US History

AP U.S. History is a year-long, advanced history course designed for the in-depth study of the United States from pre-colonialism to modern day. Students study, research, analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources that lay out a diverse and inclusive understanding of the nation’s past. This course will prepare all students to take the AP U.S. History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

AP World History

AP World History is a more advanced, accelerated course that studies in great breadth and depth the history of mankind from prehistoric times to the present day. Students will engage in research and analysis of primary and secondary sources as they delve deep into the history of the world. This course will prepare all students to take the AP World History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

CLUBS

Chicago Hope Academy is proud to offer a wide array of club choices. Clubs have the potential to change every year based on student interest. Here is a list of potential clubs.

Art

Chapel Worship Team

Film

Improv

Photography

Yearbook

Robotics

Strategy Games

Student Government

Boys to Men

Spiritual Life Leadership

Book Club

Chess

Girl Talk

Investment