Academics

Hope incorporates a biblical worldview into our classes. We prepare our students for college and life through excellent, rigorous, and relevant classes. We emphasize public speaking and argumentative writing throughout our curriculum. In addition to core classes, students can select from a variety of unique electives each semester.

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About Chicago Hope Academy

Your high school decision is an important one. This is the place where you will spend the next four years growing in friendships, knowledge, and most importantly in your faith. At Chicago Hope Academy you will find the support you need to achieve your goals. Learn more by watching the video.

OUR PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

A Christian Philosophy of Education must begin, have its continual frame of reference, and end with the eternal God. Such conformity, acknowledges the following:

God is the ultimate source of all truth (John 14:6). Therefore, His Word (revealed truth) holds a position of priority over human reason. His Word enables one to view all of life, in both its temporal and eternal aspects from the perspective of the centrality of God rather than the centrality of man (Psalm 1:18-32). Any distinction between “sacred truth” and “secular truth” is, therefore, a false dichotomy.

A differentiation must be made between earthly wisdom (1 Corinthians 1-2; James 3:15) and spiritual wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:30, 7:10-16; James 3:13,17), while acknowledging that the source of all true wisdom and understanding is God Himself (Proverbs 1:7, 9:10, 15:33; Col 2:3).

The purpose of Christian education is to demonstrate to the student his need of a personal, saving relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, and to nurture, admonish, and encourage the student to live in conformity with the revealed will of God through a life of service, wholly dedicated to and dependent upon God (Romans 12).

The process of Christian education requires the natural integration and consistent application of God’s Word into every area (academic, extracurricular, administrative, etc.) of Hope’s program (Ephesians 4:4-6).

Students do not have to be Christians in order to attend Chicago Hope Academy. We do not require that our students or their families align their personal faith with Hope’s Statement of Faith. Hope does, however, make no apologies about teaching from a Biblical worldview. We do require that our students abide by the boundaries and guidelines set by the Academy, with the understanding that many of these guidelines are Biblically-based.

Read our Statement of Faith

CORE CLASSES BY GRADE

View Elective Courses

9th Grade

English I
Algebra I
Human Geography
Biology
Spanish I
Foundations of Faith

10th Grade

English II
Geometry
World History
Chemistry

Spanish II

Sociology: Christianity & Culture
Psychology: Christianity & Self

11th Grade

English III
Algebra II
U.S. History
Environmental Science
Philosophy: Christianity & the Mind
Elective

12th Grade

English IV
Statistics/AP Calc
Christian Theology & Apologetics
College & Career Prep
Applied Economics
Civics & Geography
Electives

Foundations of Faith

Foundations of Faith is a freshman level, year-long Bible course that seeks to introduce students to the all-encompassing scope of the Hebrew Old Testament and the Christian New Testament. This course lays a foundation for Hope students that they will build on throughout their high school experience. Students will become familiar with the concepts of God, creation, fall, exodus, covenant, theocracy, kingship, prophesy, Messiah, redemption, salvation, and more. By studying history through the recorded truth of the Bible and other prominent scholarly sources, coupled with accounts and stories from over 2000 years of faith testimonies, this course stakes the claim that the Christ of the Bible is also the Son of God, the redeemer of the world, and the only means to eternal life with mankind’s creator.

 

Christian Theology & Apologetics

Christian Theology and Apologetics is Hope’s signature class. All seniors take this class in preparation for graduation. This course seeks to prepare students for post-secondary endeavors. Whether it be the workforce, college, or trade school, Hope graduates must be equipped with a worldview that sustains the pressures of a humanistic society. The teachings of Christ guide this class, as students study, analyze, and internalize Christian principles that will direct them on a course of truth, goodness, faith, and justice. Studying great scholars, including CS Lewis, RC Sproul, and others, will provide a network of thought and theory for Hope graduates to lean upon in their future aspirations beyond Hope. A significant component of this course is the Senior Capstone Assignment. This is a lengthy, researched, and laboriously revised personal essay that encompasses the student’s faith, ambition, and hope for the future.

English I

English I is a year-long course that focuses on the study of literature, language, and composition. The course emphasizes the introduction and practice of the essential skills of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. Toward that end, students study various genres of literature through a wide variety of literature selections from across the globe with diverse racial, cultural, social, and gender representation. Students are taught literary interpretation, written and oral critique of literature, and literature’s place in the history of human thought from a Christian worldview.

 

English II

English II is a year-long course designed as a continuation of English I that seeks to build upon prior knowledge and skill in the study of literature, language, and composition. Like English I, this course places great emphasis on the continued development and study of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. Drawing from all genres, students study a wide variety of selections of literature from across the globe with diverse racial, cultural, social and gender representation. Literary interpretation and critique are studied in light of the history of human thought from a Christian worldview.

 

English III

English III is a year-long course designed as a continuation of English II which continues to build upon literary knowledge and skills with a focus on the study of literature, language, and composition. Like English II, this course places great emphasis on the grade-level appropriate acquisition of the essential skills of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. A wide variety of selections of literature from various literary genres are studied, representative of diverse racial, cultural, social and gender authors from across the globe. Literary interpretation and critique are studied in light of the history of human thought from a Christian worldview.

 

English IV

English IV is a year-long course designed as a continuation of English III yet with an accelerated pace and depth of content that focuses on the study of literature, language, and composition. Like English III, this course places great emphasis on the continued development of the grade-level appropriate essential skills of grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thought. In this course, students study in depth a wide variety of selections from various literary genres taken from across the globe. There is an intentional focus on diverse racial, cultural, social and gender-based works, used for an advanced development of literary interpretation and models for student writing. The structural framework of the course revolves around the study of universal themes as found in fiction and non-fiction literature from around the globe and across time as seen from a Christian worldview.

 

AP Literature & Composition

AP Literature & Composition is a year-long, advanced English course that may be taken in place of English III or English IV. Being a college-level course, this class will challenge students to think more critically, read more thoroughly, and write more effectively. AP Literature & Composition will follow the Advanced Placement curriculum guidelines, preparing students to take the AP examination at the end of the year.

 

AP Language & Composition

AP English Language and Composition is an introductory college-level composition course. Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore topics like rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style

Language Arts

Language Arts will be focused on all things reading! Comprehension, vocabulary, literary terms, genres, etc. This class will supplement their English I class with the intention to build reading muscles. It’s our goal that each student jump at least two reading levels by the end of the year and fall in love with reading. Students will be assisted in getting a library card and taught how to find books that interest them. Students will be listening to reading, reading aloud, and provided time for silent reading. Students will be taught how to read at home: find a special place, find a quiet place, leave the phone in a different room, etc.
This is a valuable class for freshmen to enhance their reading scores and to have a lot of fun! The books will be high-interest that get students hooked on reading. Time to put down the screens and pick up a book!

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra is a one-year math course designed to prepare the student for Algebra I. The course focuses on mathematical principles like number sense, number fluency, estimation, fractions, algebraic formulas, measurement and geometry skills in the context of algebra preparedness.

 

Algebra I

Algebra I is a one-year course intent upon the student’s understanding and application of the history of Algebra and its practical application to the lives of the students and their other disciplines. This foundational course aims to offer students a broad overview of algebraic topics. In this course students will hone their skills of simplifying, evaluating, and solving basic equations and functions of algebra. While building fluency with these skills, students will develop the habit of problem solving and the proper use of mathematical symbols and rules which dictate their use in patterns and structures set forth in the number system.

 

Algebra II

Algebra II is a one-year course which builds upon the skills and knowledge learned in Algebra I, creating a working understanding of the real number system. The study of linear equations, sequences, series, functions, graphs, inequalities, polynomials, exponentials, logarithms and radical expressions are among the many advanced mathematical principles studied.

 

Geometry

Geometry is a one-year course based upon a unique combination of mathematics and logic. On one hand, geometry is the mathematical study of how figures with varying shapes, sizes, and relative positions fit together in visual space. On the other, it’s an exploration of the basic rules of logical and formal reasoning. Using a creative, hands-on approach, students will learn the classical Euclidean methods for describing and measuring figures and compositions as they appear, and will practice critical thinking using fundamental logical principles. By the end of the term, geometry students will have grown comfortable with basic reasoning, developed a thorough understanding of geometric principles, both abstractly and as they apply to realistic situations.

 

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus is a one-year course designed for a highly motivated and above-average student with prior success in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course consists of the combined study of analytical geometry, trigonometry, derivatives, integrals, matrices, functions, logic fields, relations, vector spaces, methods of proof and other math analysis topics as preparation for calculus.

 

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a year-long course of advanced mathematics in which students master knowledge and skills relating but not limited to the rate of change of variables, volume by rotation, derivatives, optimization problems, integrals, integration and area under a curve. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB examination.

 

Statistics

Statistics is a specially designed advanced mathematics course offered with the intent of introducing students to major concepts and tools as they relate to data collection, analysis, and conclusions. In this course, sampling, experimentation, patterns, and inference are a few of the conceptual themes applied to the study of statistics.

Accounting

Biology/Health

Biology is a year-long course which acknowledges the created world of God and deals with the relationships between living organisms and their environment, including the various levels of classification of the living organisms known to man in the molecular, cellular and ecological realms. This course places emphasis on the scientific skills of experimentation, measurement, and reporting.

 

Honors / AP Biology

Honors/AP Biology is an advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level biology course. With an acknowledgement of a God-created world, this class walks students through research, study, investigations, and exploration of such topics like creationism, intelligent design, evolution, energetics, information storage and transfer, and system interactions. This course will prepare all students to take the AP Biology examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

Chemistry Concepts

Chemistry Concepts is an introductory, year-long course focused on basic understanding and application of chemistry. The course is designed for students who need the main concepts of chemistry at a pace that determines successful acquisition. Chemistry Concepts teaches students about the structure and composition of matter which comprises all living things, while focusing on the topics of chemical reactions, solutions, lab techniques, and chemical frameworks.

 

Chemistry

Chemistry is a year-long course focused on the applied knowledge of chemistry. Through the study of the structure and composition of matter, this course takes students beyond the textbook into the lab for hands-on chemical experimentation with the purpose of understanding and applying scientific knowledge from the field of chemistry. The students gain a comprehensive understanding of chemical properties and interactions. Subtopics include: nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, electrochemistry, kinetic chemistry, thermodynamics and macromolecules.

 

Honors Chemistry

 

Environment Science

 

 

AP Environmental Science

AP Environmental Science is a year-long, advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level course. Students cultivate their understanding of the interrelationships of the natural world through inquiry-based lab investigations and field work as they explore concepts like the four Big Ideas; energy transfer, interactions between earth systems, interactions between different species and the environment, and sustainability.

Human Geography/Computer Literacy

Year long Course

World History

World History is a year-long course that seeks to outline and study the history of the world from prehistoric eras through modern day. Students are taught to research, study, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary historical texts that provide a general overview of the history of mankind across the globe, including all continental cultural, social, political, and economic developments.

 

Honors / AP World History

Honors/AP World History is a more advanced, accelerated course that studies in great breadth and depth the history of mankind from prehistoric times to the present day. Students will engage in research and analysis of primary and secondary sources as they delve deep into the history of the world. This course will prepare all students to take the AP World History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

 

U.S. History

U.S. History is a year-long course which introduces in breadth and depth the study of United States history from pre-colonial times to modern day events. The themes of historical study are applied to American history as students engage in the acquisition of the U.S. economic, political, social, cultural, racial, religious, technological and military past.

 

Honors / AP U.S. History

Honors/AP U.S. History is a year-long, advanced history course designed for the in-depth study of the United States from pre-colonialism to modern day. Students study, research, analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources that lay out a diverse and inclusive understanding of the nation’s past. This course will prepare all students to take the AP U.S. History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

 

Geography & World Events

 

AP Human Geography

AP Human Geography is an introductory college-level human geography course. Students cultivate their understanding of human geography through data and geographic analyses as they explore topics like patterns and spatial organization, human impacts and interactions with their environment, and spatial processes and societal changes.

Civics

Civics is a one-semester course that teaches the history and concepts of citizenship and government, with focuses on civic life, politics, and the development of the United States. This course provides information on the connections between American politics and world affairs, law and power, the American constitution and the rights of its citizens, and the American political system and other political systems throughout the world.

 

AP U.S. Government:

AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.

Psychology: Christianity & Self

Psychology: Christianity & the Self is a semester-long Bible course taken during the sophomore year that focuses on Scripture, Christ, Redemption, and the construct of self: mind, body, and soul. Following the Survey of the Bible, Christianity and the Mind takes the study of Christianity to a more personal place, a place of self-reflection, self-discipline, and self-understanding. Students engage in contemporary and traditional reflections of Scripture by men and women who have grappled with the notion of being a Christ-follower in an age of atheism, agnosticism, humanism, universalism, and nihilism. This course prepares students for their junior level Bible class which focuses on Christ-followers immersed in a culture of need.

 

Sociology: Christianity & Culture

Sociology: Christianity and Culture is Hope’s junior year Bible course that focuses on the principles of Scripture that teach followers of Christ how to engage in culture. With the study of both the Bible and current writings on Christians’ role in culture, this course guides discussion on race, diversity, feminism, poverty, politics, abortion, homosexuality, environmental responsibilities, and gender. Students are encouraged to learn how to embrace kindness, justice, and truth in an age of hate and deception.

 

Philosophy: Christianity & the Mind

Year Long Class

Spanish I

Spanish I is a year-long course designed to teach the beginnings of Spanish language acquisition emphasizing the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing Spanish at an introductory level. Although the main focus of the class is Spanish language communication, there is an intentional incorporation of the teaching of Hispanic cultures for historical and social relevance. The course reinforces the continual practice of the correct usage of basic vocabulary and Spanish language structures while instilling an appreciation for the rich history and diversity of the language.

 

Spanish II

Spanish II is a year-long course that continues the progress made in Spanish I toward the acquisition of the Spanish language. Students will participate in a course designed for proficiency and the furthering of communication in oral and written expression. Cultural significance takes a larger role as students are encouraged to engage in dialogue with native speakers and to participate in the consumption of media presented in the Spanish language.

A more sophisticated study of grammar and language will take place as students advance in their study of the Spanish language.

 

Spanish III

Spanish III & IV are year-long courses designed to bring the student to a level of conversational mastery with vocabulary, grammar, and sentence formation that demonstrates advanced language acquisition. Introductory level short stories and other Spanish literature and media are used to further develop paraphrasing and reading comprehension skills. Students are pushed toward advanced proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking Spanish.

 

Heritage 1:Spanish for Native Speakers

 

Heritage 2:Spanish for Native Speakers

Year long course

Greek 1

Year long Courses

Greek 2

Year long course

College & Career Prep

College & Career Prep is a semester-long course. The focus of the course is to teach the basics of college-level academic writing and communication. The objective of this class is to lay a foundation for communication in the college application process, post-secondary education, and beyond. The emphasis is on honing basic academic writing skills including advanced essay writing, research, and technical writing. This course also teaches and equips students to perfect their college admissions personal statement.

Applied Economics

Applied Economics is a semester-long course taken during the second semester senior year. Economics II focuses on the personal practice of sound economic principles. The knowledge of economics is taught in application of personal finance as students study banking, loan and debt systems, college and career money management, real estate, investment and more. The goal of this course is to send students out into the world with the competencies and skills to achieve and maintain financial stability and growth.

Finding God and pop culture

This course will examine the main doctrines of Christian theology (God, Jesus, Holy Spirit, Humanity, Angels and Demons, the Church, etc.) through the lens of popular culture. By engaging with movies, art, music, poetry, and fiction students will gain skills in discernment and evaluation.

Archeology

In this course, we will learn the history and methods of archaeology while exploring the world of the Bible and how archaeology illuminates Scripture. A study of cultures, customs, languages and rituals that throw light on the statements in God’s Word.

EYE (Entrepreneurial Youth Experience)

Visual Art

Film

AP Biology

AP Biology is an advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level biology course. With an acknowledgement of a God-created world, this class walks students through research, study, investigations, and exploration of such topics like creationism, intelligent design, evolution, energetics, information storage and transfer, and system interactions. This course will prepare all students to take the AP Biology examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a year-long course of advanced mathematics in which students master knowledge and skills relating but not limited to the rate of change of variables, volume by rotation, derivatives, optimization problems, integrals, integration and area under a curve. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB examination.

AP Environmental Science

AP Environmental Science is a year-long, advanced course for highly-motivated students ready for an introductory college-level course. Students cultivate their understanding of the interrelationships of the natural world through inquiry-based lab investigations and field work as they explore concepts like the four Big Ideas; energy transfer, interactions between earth systems, interactions between different species and the environment, and sustainability.

AP Government

AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.

AP Human Geography

AP Human Geography is an introductory college-level human geography course. Students cultivate their understanding of human geography through data and geographic analyses as they explore topics like patterns and spatial organization, human impacts and interactions with their environment, and spatial processes and societal changes.

AP Language & Composition

AP English Language and Composition is an introductory college-level composition course. Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore topics like rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style.

AP Literature & Composition

AP Literature & Composition is a year-long, advanced English course that may be taken in place of English III or English IV. Being a college-level course, this class will challenge students to think more critically, read more thoroughly, and write more effectively. AP Literature & Composition will follow the Advanced Placement curriculum guidelines, preparing students to take the AP examination at the end of the year.

AP US History

AP U.S. History is a year-long, advanced history course designed for the in-depth study of the United States from pre-colonialism to modern day. Students study, research, analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources that lay out a diverse and inclusive understanding of the nation’s past. This course will prepare all students to take the AP U.S. History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

AP World History

AP World History is a more advanced, accelerated course that studies in great breadth and depth the history of mankind from prehistoric times to the present day. Students will engage in research and analysis of primary and secondary sources as they delve deep into the history of the world. This course will prepare all students to take the AP World History examination. Students electing not to take the Advanced Placement exam are granted Honors credit.

Printable Course Catalogue

Faculty

Johanna DeHaven

World History, AP World History, Honors World History

Ms. DeHaven teaches each level of World History at Chicago Hope Academy. She went to Wheaton College for both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Her bachelor’s is in Bible and Theology and her master’s is in History of Christianity. Ms. DeHaven also received her teaching certification in Secondary Education - Social Studies/History from the University of Illinois-Springfield. In her spare time, Ms. DeHaven enjoys reading, running, watching baseball, traveling, and playing with her family’s dogs.

Stephen Schreiber

Philosophy: Christianity & the Mind

Dionne McKenzie

English II, Honors English II

My name is Dionne McKenzie. I will be joining the English Department working with the 10th graders. I am a Chicago native, but ventured away to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale for my undergraduate degree. I returned to Chicago to receive my graduate degree from Chicago State University. I am also a mom of 4 wonderful children, who certainly keep me busy while I am at home. I enjoy the following in my spare time: traveling with my family; working as a doula; reading multiple books at once; exercercising indoors and outdoors; and training in the African-Brazilian martial art of Capoeira.

Harold Richert

Civics, Geography

Mr. Richert teaches A.P. American Government and Politics and A.P. Human Geography. He was born in Chicago. During high school, he developed a relationship with Jesus through bible study and having a prayerful mother. Mr.Richert graduated from Northeastern Illinois University. In his spare time, he enjoys being active in church ministry, bike riding, reading books on bible prophecy and current events. He also speaks Spanish, plays keyboard and wrote and directed a play called “The Good Chicagoan” based off of the The Parable of the Good Samaritan.

Ruby Lorenzo

Chemistry

Born and raised in Manila, Philippines, Ruby Yao Lorenzo speaks Hokkien, Filipino, English, and Mandarin. Interested in natural sciences, she majored in Chemistry, the central science for her bachelor degree obtained from Far Eastern University. While teaching Chemistry in Ateneo de Manila High School, she pursued and obtained the degree, Master of Science in Chemistry Education from Ateneo de Manila University. After teaching for 11 years, she became a senior school administrator in two Christian schools in Metro Manila before her migration to United States in 2005. From 2007 until the present, she resumed her teaching career at Chicago Hope Academy where she teaches Chemistry, Chemistry Concepts, Honors Chemistry, Health and Pre-Algebra. In 2015, she obtained the degree, Post Baccalaureate in Health Information Management from UIC. She had fond memories of her travel in 9 countries. In her spare time, Mrs. Lorenzo enjoys watching sci-fi, listening to classical music and preaching of Joseph Prince, Perry Stone, and John Hagee. Her husband and she attend the Parkview Christian Church in Orland Park.

Bart Marchant

Entrepreneurship

Timothy Han

Language Arts, Film

Mr. Han is a first-year teacher at Chicago Hope Academy. Since graduating from Chapman University Dodge Film School in 2012, he has worked in Hollywood as a development assistant, a script reader, and worked at a major Hollywood talent agency. He has worked and lived in Washington D.C. as a legislative fellow and staff assistant for Congresswoman Maxine Waters, taught Language Arts in Minneapolis, MN, and most recently been an urban missionary and youth pastor here in Chicago IL. He is excited to join the Chicago Hope Academy English department and is committed to helping teach and equip the next generation to become compelling storytellers. Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA Mr. Han loves the Lakers, In-N-Out burgers, and films set in Los Angeles.

Emily Nerem

Emily Nerem

Biology

Emily Nerem graduated from Wheaton College with a degree in Biology. She was a member of the women’s basketball team at Wheaton as well. She will be teaching Freshman Biology, Honors Biology and AP Biology. Emily is from a small, rural town in Minnesota. This summer she is living in the Dominican Republic and working with GO Ministries. She loves talking about her experience as a swine research intern and anything about farming! She loves animals, sports and traveling. In her free time, she enjoys reading, watching movies, and eating good food.

Jose Ortiz-Morris

Human Geography, Computer Literacy, Spanish Heritage

Kirsten Madsen

Algebra II, AP Calculus

Kirsten Madsen attended Wheaton College where she played basketball and earned a degree in Secondary Education and Mathematics. Kirsten is currently pursuing a master's degree at Concordia University Irvine. In her third year at Hope, she will be the Math Department Chair and teach Algebra 2 and AP Calculus. In her free time, Kirsten enjoys playing pickleball, listening to Maverick City, and spending time with her family and friends.

Daniel Cameron

Christian Theology & Apologetics

Mr. Daniel J. Cameron is the 12th grade Bible teacher, Bible department head, and spiritual life director here at Chicago Hope Academy. He is an ordained minister and is currently completing his Ph.D. in theology at the University of Aberdeen. He has over 7 years of experience in the classroom and over 15 years of ministry experience. He is a published author and has taught as an adjunct professor at both Trinity Christian College and Moody Bible Institute.

Santiago Fajardo

Geometry, Visual Art

Santiago Fajardo was raised most of his life around Fort Lauderdale in sunny South Florida. He moved to Chicago to study at Moody Bible Institute where he earned a B.A. in Theology and also played on the men’s soccer team. While at college he met and married his wife, Reba, and they currently have two children. Santiago hopes, Lord-willing, to be ordained one day as a Western-Rite priest in the Orthodox Church. His life consists primarily of drinking specialty coffee, reading books of Christian theology, raising his two kids with his wife, and writing for his personal blog when he has the time. Santiago is also a very proud Colombian.

Talmadge Gerald

English IV, Archaeology

Mr. Gerald grew up in sunny Jacksonville, Florida, only moving to Chicago eight years ago for graduate school at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.
Completing his PhD at Andrews University, Mr. Gerald is an archaeologist who loves discussing how archaeology helps us understand and illuminate the world of the Bible. A world traveler, he has been to every continent (except Antarctica, one day) and travels to the Middle East every summer to excavate in Jordan. He played baseball in High School and College and his passions include: reading, biking, jogging, tv binging, board game playing, dog walking, feasting, and church attending with his family. He feels that Hope is a special school where students can grow in wisdom and stature with the Lord. He teaches English IV and Archaeology at Hope.

Adam Lawlor

English I, Honors English I, AP Literature & Composition

Hailing from the wonderful west coast, Mr. Lawlor currently dwells in Avondale with his wife. He graduated from the Moody Bible Institute with a BA in Bible and Youth Ministry and is currently working on a Master of Letters degree in Bible and Literature from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. He takes residence at Hope in the English Department teaching Freshman Literature, Honors Freshman Literature, and AP Literature and Composition. Mr. Lawlor also helps complete odd jobs around the administration side of the school as the English Department Head. While not occupied with his occupation: forming critical thinkers, eloquent communicators, and speedy readers, you might find Mr. Lawlor at the rock climbing gym, eating delicious and diverse cuisine, listening to a podcast from This American Life or watching a “pretentious film”. He is also a 3w2 on the enneagram, whatever that means.

Nate Brumbaugh

Foundations of Faith

Aidan Busch

AP US History, US History

Mr. Busch is a graduate of Wheaton College and teaches AP, Honors, and on-level United States History. He is passionate about developing historical thinking skills, literacy, and the ability of his students to understand complex history & resist simple utilitarian narratives. In his history classes, he emphasizes utilizing moral reflection to examine the past and ourselves as we encounter history through primary sources. Born and raised in the Chicagoland area, he is a proud Cubs fan. In his free time, he enjoys reading, running, hiking, kayaking, and doing just about anything outside with his wife.

Latausha Allen

Psychology, Sociology

Roberto Martinez

Spanish I, Spanish & Heritage I

Mr. Martinez was born and raised on the northwest side of Chicago. He lived in the city until 8th grade, then moved to Cidra, Puerto Rico, where he attended high school. After graduating highschool in 2012, he decided to join the Army and was stationed at Fort Polk, Louisiana. After a combat deployment to Afghanistan and six years of service, it was time to hang up his uniform and hit the books. He obtained a BA in Christian Ministries Studies and Spanish. He will now put that major into practice teaching first-year Spanish at Chicago Hope Academy. In his free time, you can find him hosting a game night with friends or planning his next trip with his wife and two daughters.

Cheyenne West

Environmental Science

My name is Cheyenne West and I teach Environmental Science! I recently graduated from Olivet Nazarene University! I currently enjoy spending time with my husband Dominic, my two dogs Rosie and Bean, and my cat Fluffy! I also enjoy spending time outside! Last summer I ventured to Costa Rica where I was able to hike the Talamanca mountains and perform research on a bamboo species found at different elevations. Along with hiking, I also like running, playing tennis, and kayaking. If I’m not out in nature I am probably taking care of my plants! I am an avid plant lover and a firm believer in the idea that you can never have too many plants! While I teach environmental science here at Chicago Hope Academy, I aim to show my students my passion for taking care of the environment in hopes they will understand how magnificent this planet is!

Travis Shannan

Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, History of Sports

Daniel Sierra

Daniel Sierra

Language Arts, English III, AP Language and Composition

Mr. Sierra grew up near Seattle, Washington; this city and the surrounding Pacific Northwest region are still close to his soul. After completing his Bachelor's degree at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Mr. Sierra and his wife moved to Vancouver, Canada, where he attended Regent College and completed his Master's in theology, with an emphasis on how theology, philosophy, and literature all interact with one another. Mr. Sierra is thrilled to teach Hope's American Literature and AP Language and Composition courses. Teaching these courses offers many opportunities for students to grow more confident in their ability to read and comprehend literary texts. These are moments that bring Mr. Sierra the most joy as a teacher. Some of Mr. Sierra's favorite authors are: Saint Augustine, Albert Camus, Toni Morrison, Pablo Neruda, and Ernest Hemingway. He is passionate about cycling, Dark Matter Coffee, cheering on the Seattle Sounders, taking his two kids to the playground, and air-frying a variety of vegetables.

Patrick Derdall

Esther Dukes

Spanish II, Spanish III

Mrs. Dukes was born and raised outside of San Jose, Costa Rica. She grew up attending many church and youth camps where she quickly learned how to lead games and activities, and most importantly love the Lord. For university, she attended the Universidad Latina de Costa Rica where she studied Investigative Journalism. She has worked and traveled in Brazil and Germany before coming to the US. Mrs. Dukes is trilingual in Spanish, English, and Portuguese. She spent the spring 2022 semester helping substitute and guide students at Hope and is excited to be teaching full time. In her free time she loves to go hiking with friends and family, finding new waterfalls, hosting friends with her husband, and encouraging people in their gifts.

Peter Dukes

College and Career Prep, Economics

Mr. Dukes grew up primarily in the western suburbs of Chicago. He studied Spanish, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Iowa for undergrad and recently completed a master’s in Higher Education and Student Development at Wheaton College. Following undergrad, he spent several years in business and sales and eventually came to Hope as a Track and Field coach. Since working at Hope, he’s helped out with the business office, the international students’ boarding program, College and Career Counseling, Cross Country, Track and Field and most recently Pre Algebra and Algebra 1. He is grateful and excited to help students work through their next steps in college and their careers as he understands that the habits students build now help determine the outcomes of their future (2 Corinthians 9:6). In his free time he enjoys reading, hosting friends with his wife, being outdoors, working out, and traveling.

CLUBS

Chicago Hope Academy is proud to offer a wide array of club choices. Clubs have the potential to change every year based on student interest. Here is a list of potential clubs.

Art

Chapel Worship Team

Film

Improv

Photography

Yearbook

Robotics

Strategy Games

Student Government

Boys to Men

Spiritual Life Leadership

Book Club

Chess

Girl Talk

Investment